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Full text of "Editorial Notes"

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California Law Review 

Published by the Faculty and Students jf the School jf Jurisprudence tf the 
University gf California, and issued Bi-monthly throughout the Year J(C & 3P 



Subscription Price, $2.50 Per Year Single Copies, 50 Cents 

— — .., ..-■ IIL-fl- ■ ■■■■■ l— ■ ■ HI ^ — ■■. — — ■.!.-> — — II ■ I I— — — ..... . I-.. 

ORRIN K. McMtJRRAY, Editor-in-Chief. 

W. W. FERRIER, JR., Student Editor-in-Chief 

T. J. LEDWICH, Business Manager 



Faculty Board of Editors 

WM. CAREY JONES A. P. MATTHEW 

WM. E. COLBY M. C. LYNCH 

A. M. KIDD M. E. HARRISON 



Student Board of Editors 

ARTHUR ALLYN H . C. KELSEY 

M. C. BAER D. A. MACE 

H. S. DON CARLOS S . R. STERNE 

C. S. JOHNSTON M . K. WILD 

T. A. J. DOCKWEILER 

EDITORIAL NOTES 



FOURTH ANNUAL MEETING OF CALIFORNIA 
BAR ASSOCIATION 

The fourth annual meeting of the California Bar Association 
was held at San Diego, on November 20-22, 1913. The meeting 
was held midway between legislative sessions, and the discus- 
sion, therefore, of legal reforms was not so thorough as at the 
last annual meeting, an account of which is contained in the first 
volume of this Review. 1 

The proposition that evoked the most discussion was the 
proposed constitutional convention. The opinion of the bar, as 

1 1 California Law Review, 170. 



138 CALIFORNIA LAW REVIEW 

represented at this meeting, was overwhelmingly against such 
convention. Cumbersome as our present organic act is, there was 
little hope that a simpler one would emerge from a new dis- 
cussion. On the contrary, it seemed to be the opinion of most 
of those who spoke upon the subject that additional details were 
likely to be added, which would prove embarrassing to effective 
legislation. 

The papers read before the Association were of more than 
usual interest. Two of them, because of their intrinsic import- 
ance and because of the interest attaching to their authorship, 
are reprinted in the present number of this Review. Another 
paper, which evoked much comment, was that by Mr. R. S. 
Gray, on "The Reorganization of the Bar as a Necessary Means 
to Justice." Mr. Gray took the position that many of the evils 
in the present administration of law were due to the fact that 
the trial lawyer is, by virtue of the fact of his private employ- 
ment, too much a partisan. He advocated not merely the sepa- 
ration of the functions of the attorney and the barrister, but 
the entire abolition of the system of permitting either the client 
or the attorney to select a trial lawyer. He would have the trial 
lawyer, as the district attorney is now, — and, in some places, the 
public defender also, 2 — a state official, under civil service, drawn 
by lot for the particular case, in some such way as the jury is 
now drawn. Other interesting papers were those by Robert A. 
Waring, on the "Inheritance Tax Act" and by Hon. W. 1. 
Morrison on the "Workmen's Compensation, Insurance and 
Safety Act." 

The Association elected William J. Hunsaker, of Los Angeles, 
as President, and T. W. Robinson, of Los Angeles, as Secretary, 
for the ensuing year. O. K. M. 



2 As to the public defender under the Los Angeles Charter see 1 
California Law Review, 52.